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Antonio Jaramillo

Immigrant Archive Project
Raised in a Mexican orphanage, the Mayans M.C., Shades of Blue and Savages co-star used to dream of having his own family one day. Now that he has it, Antonio Jaramillo says it’s his greatest source of pride. We discuss his immigrant journey, and how the theatre and the arts provided a sense of identity and the tools to overcome his childhood trauma.
Show transcript
00:00
I'm extremely fortunate grateful that uh the universe God
00:04
life art has given me a green light to cross the street and I
00:10
done my work so that I can stick around.
00:19
Let's begin the way we do with everyone, please, with your
00:21
name and your nationality.
00:23
OK.
00:23
Uh My name is Antonio Jail.
00:26
A um a Mexican from Mexico.
00:28
Where, where were you born in Mexico?
00:30
I was born in Tijuana, Tijuana Baja California.
00:33
And you live in Mexico until um until I was 14, I grew up in an
00:38
orphanage over there and then I came over to reconnect with
00:43
uh family that they said I had over here.
00:47
So I went and searched my family.
00:49
Let's go back before you came over.
00:51
What, what are some of your earliest childhood memories?
00:56
Uh They're not too good.
00:59
Um I remember lots of kids, everybody.
01:02
Um some fighting with one another, others playing others
01:07
A little sad, not, not too happy.
01:10
Maybe someone crying over there are, are your earliest memories
01:13
from uh the orphanage there?
01:16
Yeah, I spent 10 years there so they prevail, they're the strongest
01:21
I mean, and what and what was life like for you there.
01:25
Um, it was, uh, I mean, now that now as an adult I can, I can have
01:31
an opinion on it when I was living.
01:33
It, it just felt strange but it was quite, uh, I guess, uh, lonely
01:40
It was, um, hard to get attention, you know, even from the other
01:45
ones around you, the kids, the ones that have been there longest
01:48
they, they just, they beat you up, you know, to tough you up
01:52
and then the new ones, you would try to comfort them because
01:56
they were going through the same thing.
01:57
You just had gone through yourself.
02:00
So it was, um, just, um, it was learning, learning to, to cope
02:06
with, you know, the craziness.
02:09
It was all kids.
02:10
It was all, it was all boys.
02:11
I mean, no, no girls, just boys.
02:14
I would imagine it would be tough to make friends in that kind
02:16
of environment where you don't know who's coming, who's going
02:19
who's it is.
02:21
It was, it was hard to make friends because first you come in
02:24
and, you know, as I said, it's a normal, normal reaction.
02:27
The ones that have been there long, they gonna beat you up,
02:29
make fun of you, blah, blah, blah.
02:31
You know, that's how they cope with their issue.
02:35
And so you're not becoming friends with them and then the youngest
02:39
ones that come in, they're not in a position to make friends
02:43
they're just asking for their mama and papa and na na, so I
02:47
I'm not, yeah, I mean, I, I, to this day I have no connection
02:51
to anyone from the orphanage and there was about 300 kids there
02:55
I would imagine many of them are incarcerated.
02:58
Uh, maybe not no longer with us.
03:01
Uh, maybe homeless.
03:02
Um, because at 18 they just, you're out, here's $100 and out
03:09
out where, you know, so, you know, II, I, yeah, I don't have
03:14
any friends come there.
03:15
II, I wish I did.
03:17
But I don't, my brother who was there too.
03:20
So I guess was your brother the same period?
03:23
He was there at the same period where a year apart and he was
03:27
my older brother and he was there too.
03:29
So, but we, we drifted because she ended up crying all the time
03:34
and I didn't like that, you know.
03:36
So I, I ended up being the opposite.
03:40
I tough myself up and so I coped with it.
03:43
And so he went over there with the cried babies and I went over
03:45
here with the tough boys, you know, but we were all on the same
03:49
on the same boat.
03:51
Sounds like it's uh a hell of a place to learn both ends, both
03:55
compassion and the need to, to toughen up.
03:58
No, it was a very tough place to try to find that balance of,
04:02
of you gotta toughen up or, and, and find the compassion for
04:06
those who are, I guess suffering.
04:09
You know, the new ones, you know, you could always see the pain
04:11
and the same feelings you went through when there was a new
04:14
kid that just came in.
04:15
The new guy, you know, uh, I took on the role of defending them
04:20
So I ended up fighting with the other kids because I didn't
04:23
like how they would.
04:24
I know it's just a, a defense mechanism for them as well.
04:28
Just, you know how they, how they were coping with their pain
04:30
to make fun of the other.
04:32
Uh But, you know, I ended up getting into a lot of fights for
04:35
trying to stop trying to stop that.
04:38
Perhaps I've been doing this too long.
04:40
But, but I see, I see certain parallels to the, the immigrant
04:45
journey in what you went through there.
04:48
You know, that's uh uh very vulnerable.
04:51
Uh You gotta toughen up very quickly.
04:54
Uh You gotta, you gotta look out for yourself, but at the same
04:58
time, you gotta be very compassionate to others that are going
05:01
through the same thing you are.
05:03
Yes, I mean, it's, it's very similar to what immigrants have
05:06
to deal with because they come into a new place and they don't
05:09
know anyone, no one knows them.
05:11
And you know, people beat you up, if not physically, verbally
05:15
or by the way, they treat you socially, you're not accepted
05:18
you know, that, that takes a toll on a person.
05:21
And so the immigrant has to fight real hard to, for a sense of
05:25
identity, a sense of pride.
05:27
Um But at the same time being surrounded by, you know, your
05:32
your compadres, you know, your, your fellow immigrants
05:36
were going through the same thing and, and you constantly
05:39
see their pain and, and it's hard.
05:42
You gotta, because you gotta toughen up.
05:43
It's like, look, uh we gotta get up tomorrow morning and go
05:45
to work and fight one more time and then you see your friends
05:51
in pain because of they, they left loved ones, kids wives and
05:56
the struggle can be very difficult, you know, to get up every
05:59
morning and get beat up verbally or physically.
06:04
It's, it's a tough situation.
06:05
You know what I mean?
06:06
And they're just trying to work, they're just trying to work
06:08
That's all they want.
06:08
You know, that's, people can criticize them all they want
06:12
but you have to respect and admire the fight in them.
06:19
Most people would give up.
06:21
They get up, they go through rivers, mountains walls.
06:25
I don't care.
06:26
I'll take the $6 an hour, 14, 16 hours a day picking fruit or
06:31
whatever it is.
06:32
You won't.
06:33
I will.
06:34
And they do it.
06:35
That's, that, that, that, that I think that should be.
06:39
There's a sense of admiration and respect.
06:42
Most people won't do that.
06:43
Can't do that and they do it.
06:46
That's so true.
06:47
And with no safety net now many people think, oh, they come
06:51
here to take uh social services and, uh, no, no, no.
06:56
Most cases.
06:57
Absolutely.
06:58
No.
06:58
So, no, no, no safety net.
07:00
And, and it's been my experience that they do it year in and
07:02
year out and I, you could hear one complaint have yet to one
07:08
immigrants don't complain too much.
07:10
They don't complain.
07:11
And they, they're not out there asking for pocket change.
07:15
They actually sell you something.
07:17
If it's not fruit, it's a blanket or a, or a little piggy bank
07:21
or, or something they created, I don't know, a guitar with
07:23
one string.
07:24
I don't know.
07:25
Or, or they sing you a song or, or they clean your window, uh
07:29
the, your, of the car, you know, can I clean the window?
07:32
Can I get, they offer a service in return for, you know, money
07:37
Not, not just give me money because I have nowhere to go.
07:41
No, no, no.
07:42
Here's what I can offer you.
07:44
My service.
07:45
Would you pay me for it?
07:46
I mean, it's, it's, it's a struggle.
07:48
It's quite a tough life that they do that they have to, um, live
07:52
And what was your immigrant journey?
07:55
Like?
07:55
Tell me how you found out that you were coming to the US.
07:58
Um, well, I reconnected with my biological mother and then
08:04
I found out I had relatives in the States.
08:06
And so I said, well, I, maybe I should go visit them.
08:09
Who are these people?
08:11
Um, and how did you get, uh, she came back?
08:15
10 years later to see if we were still there.
08:17
We were, uh, yeah, she, I, I guess, you know, it was out of necessity
08:23
that she put her kids and her finish.
08:24
You know, it's not because she had some addiction to something
08:28
or it was just financial reasons.
08:30
And 10 years later, a half sister of hers offered help and said
08:34
you know, let's go and see if they're there and they can stay
08:37
with me or I can help.
08:39
So we were still there.
08:40
And so we're like, we're connecting with these people and
08:43
then uh we ended up staying with her half sister.
08:46
Wait, hang on a second.
08:49
Sorry.
08:49
No, no, no, no.
08:51
It was fascinating.
08:52
So you're in the orphanage.
08:53
You've never met your mom before.
08:56
Obviously, you don't, at least you don't remember.
08:59
And how did you get worried that your mom's there that she's
09:01
coming for you guys?
09:03
Well, when we went in, my brother was five, I was four.
09:06
So, so we did the first, the first early years we lived with
09:11
mom and dad, but that is, it was too early.
09:14
We were there at four or 5, 10 years later.
09:18
After that, my mother and a and a half sister of hers came, came
09:23
back to see if we're still there.
09:25
A lot of kids get adopted.
09:26
But uh but we didn't because we made a pact.
09:29
Me and my brother, we were two.
09:31
Nobody wants two for one.
09:32
Say, wait, No.
09:34
Uh, I like him but wait, he comes.
09:36
Oh, no, no, no.
09:37
That's too many.
09:39
So, we were still there and they asked us if we wanted to come
09:43
with them and, you know, I mean, the answer is obvious.
09:46
Um, but it wasn't a very clean transition.
09:49
It was quite a messy and we're meeting people.
09:52
We don't know.
09:53
And our, you know, our behavior, attitudes that me and my brother
09:57
have, it's so not easy to deal with, but I don't know, what would
10:01
you expect?
10:03
And so it wasn't a good, um, I guess coming together and we would
10:09
stay with relatives but not, not for very long.
10:12
Eventually we ended up with my mother again, but she couldn't
10:17
take care of us.
10:18
You know, that was why we were there.
10:20
So I, we just ended up on our own again.
10:24
Uh, um, and I was here and I thought, well, I stay here.
10:30
Well, where else am I gonna go?
10:32
So I stayed here.
10:34
Uh, you were, you were in school at the time?
10:36
I later they put me in school, um, in junior high, which was
10:42
quite tough because my English was horrible and my, uh, attitude
10:48
was horrible.
10:50
So I was always getting in trouble.
10:52
Um, and I didn't do very good in school.
10:54
It was very hard to, I mean, I'm new.
10:57
Everybody speaks English.
10:58
I speak horrible English.
11:00
So everyone makes fun of me.
11:02
I don't know how to deal with.
11:03
All these people, there's girls around which I never seen
11:06
in your friend.
11:06
There was no girls, just the nuns and they didn't look like
11:09
nuns.
11:09
So dude, that is such a recipe for disaster.
11:13
I mean, switching schools at that age is tough just going from
11:16
Santa Monica to West Hollywood in high school is tough, you
11:20
know, to go with the language issue.
11:22
The fact that you, you know, you didn't grow up around girls
11:25
and your orphanage, you didn't, that's, that's like putting
11:28
you on a different plane.
11:30
It was, it was, it was, it was quite, quite difficult that I
11:33
couldn't hang in school because my only defense mechanism
11:38
because I didn't have the verbal skills was to, to fight, hit
11:42
someone and I just was trying to defend myself, you know, because
11:46
you can't beat me up all the time by making fun of me, you know
11:50
and, and so I would cope by defending myself physically and
11:55
then I would end up in the principal's office and I, I was a problem
12:00
child and then they kicked me out and, and where am I gonna go
12:06
You know?
12:06
So, um, so you were a kid out of school?
12:08
At what age?
12:08
Oh, a couple of times in junior high.
12:13
Then I attended high school and the same thing happened and
12:17
I attended sports because I'm like, oh, you know, I, but I was
12:20
just trying to be long like any kid I just wanted to be long and
12:24
I didn't know where the orphans were, where the section of
12:26
the orphans were.
12:27
Like, where are they?
12:28
There?
12:28
There's none of those, there's the punk kids, they're smart
12:30
kids, the artsy kids, the jocks, you know there were and I was
12:33
where's my group?
12:37
Did you just say I should just go back?
12:39
I mean, did I miss the orphanage?
12:44
Hm.
12:45
That's a, that's a good question.
12:47
Uh I think I was happy to be out but I was very confused and lost
12:57
because at least the orphanage I knew I knew I got up, I did my
13:02
work.
13:02
They fit me then I fought with so and so and we play soccer and
13:06
blah, blah, blah and boom again, the same thing the next day
13:10
So the routine was, gave me a sense of comfort but I, I don't
13:15
know if I, if I, if I would say that I missed it, I mean, I, I was
13:19
it was just, um, it was quite a confusing time.
13:26
Um but uh somehow, uh you know, someone upstairs was watching
13:32
over me, uh because I could have ended up in, you know, the road
13:37
has many turns and I saw them all, you know, and, but I was able
13:41
to make a quick u-turn every time.
13:43
Was there anyone in particular or a group of people in particular
13:46
that you can say were partly responsible or perhaps wholly
13:50
responsible for, you know, good, good question because there
13:56
is one person and up until now it's only known to myself.
14:02
Uh her name was uh Soledad Canales.
14:07
She was a friend of my mother and she was the first person that
14:13
I could feel as a child that treated us with unconditional
14:19
compassion and love and understanding, no finger pointing
14:23
no, nothing.
14:25
This person was so nice to us.
14:27
She's no longer with us.
14:28
She died of cancer but she never knew it.
14:32
But her impact on me was humongous just like the work that you
14:38
do with this organization, you know, uh of filming people's
14:42
stories.
14:43
Uh The impact that those stories can have on one person watching
14:48
it at home.
14:50
You can't measure that and that's exactly what this person
14:56
is in her family that treated me like we were family when we
15:00
weren't in my own family.
15:03
I was a problem child.
15:05
And, but, you know, everybody has their own issues.
15:07
They have to deal with their own kids and their own marriage
15:09
and their own struggles as a human being.
15:11
So I don't blame anyone but this single person in her family
15:16
was lovely to us and I'm forever grateful.
15:21
It's amazing how you still remember her in such wonderful
15:24
uh sort of context.
15:26
So many years later, she was so nice.
15:31
She was so nice.
15:32
Uh So, you know, she was so nice.
15:35
Um invited us in to sleep in her home even though it was on the
15:39
floor or in the garage but it wasn't in a way that you would feel
15:43
uncomfortable and she would feed us.
15:48
Oh, yeah.
15:50
Then, then a big mansion with, uh, coldness around.
15:54
No, no, no, I'll take the garage with love and, and, and, and
15:59
her kids would give me, she had older kids.
16:02
I would, they would give us their clothes.
16:04
So we have cool clothes now because his, his, his clothes were
16:08
cool.
16:10
Uh, and he wasn't bitter, you know, because you see kids can
16:14
react in a certain way.
16:15
Not intentional, but it's like, oh, there's new people in
16:18
my home and I don't know who they are and now I have to treat them
16:20
like they're my family when they're not.
16:22
No, even the kids, even her kids, the girls and the guys, I didn't
16:28
sense any bitterness.
16:30
It would befriend us and give us their shirt and their pants
16:34
and like, hey, these shoes, I'm not wearing them.
16:36
You, you take them, wow, they're, they're vans, these vans
16:40
I never had bands.
16:42
So you put on the vans and then the shirt, whatever.
16:45
You know, they, because they had cool.
16:47
And so in a nice family, we see we won't eat them, we won't eat
16:51
them.
16:52
We don't eat this.
16:52
But it's so, so at what point did you sort of make a connection
16:55
and think that maybe acting was something, was something
16:59
viable for you.
16:59
How did that come about?
17:02
I think the acting and the theater and the art itself found
17:07
me because I was really lost.
17:10
I didn't know what or where or how.
17:13
I was just working like an immigrant to feed myself and put
17:18
a roof over my head.
17:20
And I would take any job and I've done them all cleaning toilets
17:23
dishwashing, whatever you pay me.
17:25
I do it.
17:27
Um, but I had, I guess this sense of, uh, this need to communicate
17:34
and I, I came across the works of these great playwrights,
17:40
Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams Chekov and reading their
17:43
words.
17:44
And I'm like, wow, this, this in one sentence, they just, mm
17:47
there's so much power and someone invited me to the theater
17:52
and I went in my, I guess my, I was very disconnected in my disconnectedness
18:04
or my lack of a better word.
18:06
I guess my being different was celebrated and not ridicule
18:14
And I was, I, I never felt that only in the theater are your differences
18:20
celebrated.
18:22
It's like what you wanna know about me really?
18:27
But where I grew up, who I am, who my parents?
18:32
Wow, nobody's ever asked those questions or even seem interested
18:37
So I, I felt at home and, and then I started working and the way
18:43
people would receive the work, I had never been embraced that
18:47
way by anything.
18:51
And, and it was great because I was learning about myself.
18:56
But at the same time, II, I was being used to tell a message of
19:03
whatever the scripted word was whatever the text was.
19:06
So I could do it because it wasn't me.
19:10
But it was me.
19:12
It was a wonderful balance of like I can do all these feelings
19:16
emotions, words and I can say all those things because it
19:19
isn't me.
19:20
No, no, but it is you.
19:23
And it was a wonderful sort of therapy without knowing that
19:29
it was because I ended up learning about human human beings
19:35
why we do the things we do.
19:37
And I, and, and I started not taking things so personal before
19:42
any, any time somebody would give me a look or a sort of tone
19:47
it was personal.
19:48
It was an attack and I had to defend myself and my sense of my
19:52
my sense of identity, I would automatically respond that
19:55
way.
19:55
Like what that I had to learn that we all have problems within
20:01
ourselves.
20:01
And it isn't about the person in front of you so much as it is
20:07
what's going on inside you.
20:09
But I had the theater, I had to be there to learn that, to learn
20:15
about human beings and myself and what we do and why we do it
20:20
and how and how sometimes we do things uh that we don't mean
20:27
to do, you know, but somehow it gets out of our hands and later
20:34
we have to, I guess, leave the consequences of those choices
20:38
So, uh you know, that's why I'm still here.
20:41
Art has given me a sense of identity, a profession, a life a
20:49
it's how I support myself but I never watched TV.
20:54
I didn't know what an actor was.
20:56
What did they do?
20:58
I, you know, I, for me it was learning about myself to communicate
21:04
with other people without being so violent.
21:08
You know, understanding myself is and understanding those
21:12
other people around me through the words of these great playwrights
21:16
using whatever is going on inside me.
21:18
But hey, I didn't write it.
21:21
And how did you, I mean, what, what you share with me is a very
21:24
deep understanding, uh which, you know, you wouldn't expect
21:29
from a kid who's been bouncing around school.
21:31
There's no one in the theater in his family.
21:33
He gets introduced to the theater, you know, the playwright
21:36
that you just mentioned.
21:37
I mean, I, you know, the very best of the best.
21:41
How did you even get introduced into the theater?
21:43
How did you even happen to stumble upon the theater?
21:47
How I was doing music because music helped me.
21:51
I just liked music even though I wasn't very good.
21:53
I didn't care.
21:54
Nobody, no one, no one could take it away from you.
21:57
I wanted something, no one could take away from you.
22:00
No one can take music away from you.
22:02
So you lose a CD, go buy it again and then you can sit in your room
22:07
with your music and no one will take that away.
22:10
It's yours.
22:11
So I enjoy music so much.
22:13
Because I felt it was mine and I attempted, you know, whatever
22:17
I, I was somewhat musical and I did a, a review of, of a musical
22:23
in San Diego that somebody saw and they enjoyed it, you know
22:27
and then some guy who was a theater guy asked me to come in to
22:32
read for a play and I asked him for the music.
22:34
Where's the music?
22:35
He goes?
22:35
No, no, there's no music.
22:38
I go but I need music.
22:41
I don't, II I don't know how to do that.
22:44
But he was, he insisted, he was so persistent and invited me
22:48
to the room of a room of actors to read this play.
22:52
My reading skills were first of all horrible.
22:57
But somehow my, no, no, no, nothing, nothing, nothing.
23:00
But this guy had a good eye and, and somehow my sensibilities
23:07
as a person reading that role just, just connected.
23:10
Well, so when I ended up doing that play, there was too much
23:15
about me connected already that yeah, I had to work on technical
23:19
things but the, the, the roots were there.
23:23
So the way it was received, it was wonderful.
23:27
But then later, I mean, of course, my, my, my lack of skills
23:31
would show when I would attempt things that so I ended up looking
23:36
for conservatories where I could learn, you know, because
23:40
I wanted to learn, I'm like, well, let me learn how to do this
23:44
But it was more an interest in the interest of learning or just
23:48
learning.
23:48
Just, I was just interested in it.
23:51
Um, and eventually you're gonna hear the name Arthur Miller
23:56
And it's like, who's that?
23:58
Who's that?
23:59
I didn't know who they were.
24:00
Who's that?
24:02
Well, let me go look and I just open it and just, you can just
24:05
read a couple sentences and then you go, what?
24:09
My God, you know, and then you, you, you attempt to, to do it
24:16
and you realize that.
24:17
Hm, there's a level of skills that you need here.
24:22
Where do I get them?
24:23
Let me go get them.
24:25
I had the humanity side.
24:26
I had the sensibilities that other people can go to the best
24:29
schools in the world and they can do it technically beautiful
24:33
It's like, wow, that was great.
24:35
I don't believe a thing you're doing.
24:39
II I already had that.
24:41
I just had to learn the skills.
24:44
But again, it was for myself just to learn about myself and
24:47
about people.
24:49
And 10 years ago, 2004, I auditioned for the Geffen Playhouse
24:55
here in town.
24:58
They hire me and I thought, is that a mistake?
25:03
And then there were, it was an understudy which I was studying
25:05
several roles.
25:06
But still they do.
25:08
They know I came from an orphanage.
25:10
I'm a high school dropout.
25:11
I'm a, you know how I drop out, I'm a drop out everything.
25:15
Do they do?
25:16
They know that?
25:18
And I was like, did it did it feel like you were conning them
25:21
for a while?
25:22
Did it feel like I really don't belong here all my life more
25:25
successful people feel that actually all my life it feels
25:28
that way I feel is that, are they gonna find me out?
25:32
It actually all my life feels that way.
25:34
And that's why I, I train myself as much as I can because I, I
25:41
hold on to the craft because I don't want him to find out because
25:45
if they do at least I can go.
25:46
But weed.
25:47
But II I, I've been learning, I, I, I've been searching and
25:52
and I've been testing myself.
25:54
Don't take this away from me.
25:56
So, you know.
25:57
Yes.
25:58
Yes.
25:58
I feel like I've been cunning people because in my earlier
26:02
years I, that's what, how I got jobs.
26:05
I ended up being a chef when I knew nothing about cooking.
26:08
But I had, I needed a job.
26:10
So I told him I worked there, I worked there and I give me a pan
26:14
and I put butter and smoke comes out and I look like I know what
26:17
I'm doing.
26:17
I throw mushrooms in there.
26:19
Who, so I just throw more stuff.
26:20
So it does more noise and more smoke.
26:23
But eventually I got fired because the plates were coming
26:26
back, you know.
26:28
Um But no, no, I, I, you know, but you weren't afraid to give
26:31
it a shot.
26:31
Oh, III, I just had to, I mean, I, you know, it was a job opening
26:36
I'm gonna go try, you know?
26:38
So, and, and, and while you were learning the craft, I imagine
26:42
you were doing all kinds of odd jobs and stuff.
26:45
Yeah.
26:46
No.
26:46
No.
26:46
Yeah.
26:46
I had a lot of jobs, uh, uh, when I was, uh, at San Diego State
26:50
I looked like I was a student because I was in area but I actually
26:53
was a janitor at night but nobody saw me because nobody's around
26:57
at night.
26:58
So I would clean the toilets of all the, the campus, you know
27:02
Uh, but in the daytime I look cool.
27:04
Like I was one of them, you know, because I was taking some classes
27:07
there too.
27:07
But they were, there's a way to take classes there.
27:11
There's a, a different book that you can take classes, you
27:13
pay more and you're not quite a student of the university.
27:18
But, you know what?
27:20
So, yeah, so that's what I was doing.
27:25
And I was, uh, doing a, a student body.
27:28
I mean, you're probably that age.
27:29
I was, I was like the, uh, 25 24 you know, I mean, so, yes.
27:35
No, no, I mean, I did a lot of jobs.
27:37
I, I, the, the restaurant business, you know, like a lot of
27:40
people, you know, they, that's a great industry because you
27:43
can learn fast.
27:44
There's a lot of restaurants that you can go if you're good
27:47
if you're a good worker.
27:49
And a fast learner.
27:50
Uh, there's a lot of jobs and, um, I have found jobs there and
27:54
I got very good at that, you know.
27:55
I mean, again, iii, I grab books about wine and I, I read so much
28:01
about wine just so that I, I was trying to overcompensate for
28:04
my lack of, um, education, my lack of upbringing.
28:11
So when people would be relaxing I'd be at home reading like
28:15
eight books about every grape in the world because I didn't
28:20
want, I want them to find out, find me out, you know, and when
28:25
they did, I wanted to defend myself.
28:27
So, yes.
28:28
No, no.
28:29
And it was another great person that gave me an opportunity
28:33
a at a restaurant when, when I was at arts because for a while
28:40
my permission to stay here had run out and I wasn't supposed
28:44
to be here, but I didn't know where to go and I couldn't get jobs
28:48
So it was very difficult.
28:49
I, so I really know what an immigrant goes through even though
28:52
some people, you know, uh the perception, I guess it would
28:56
be physically, I don't appear to be like them, but I was just
29:01
like them.
29:03
I, yeah, the same problem they have, they have, they had and
29:09
uh it was tough to, to navigate that.
29:13
And uh one wonderful person that gave me a green light even
29:18
though she knew he called me into the office.
29:23
And I said, oh, my God.
29:24
Just like you were asking.
29:25
Uh, are you, uh, are you afraid to be found out?
29:29
I was found out before other, um, I guess, um, when, when that
29:38
would come up, other times I would quit beforehand.
29:42
So I always look like I, I would look like I, I, I'm leaving.
29:46
I got better things to do.
29:48
No, I'm unemployed again because they found me out.
29:53
And, uh, II, I feel like I was running and I was at, I was like
29:59
I was at odds.
30:01
I'm like, what do I do?
30:03
I can't go back to the orange that won't take me in.
30:05
I'm too old.
30:07
I don't know where to go over there because I was in an orphanage
30:10
I don't know.
30:11
I mean, I could go, I guess I could just go to TJ and I don't know
30:15
sell blankets.
30:16
I don't know.
30:17
Uh, they really don't.
30:20
I know.
30:20
And I was here and I'm like, and it's not like I was like a smart
30:24
studious person like, you know, you, you, there's a lot of
30:27
people that don't have uh I guess the legal documentation
30:30
but they have the studies.
30:33
I mean, they're very smart.
30:34
They, they're gifted people that have used school to the best
30:38
the best of their abilities and, and they have master degrees
30:42
and they're not able to practice in that field.
30:46
So I didn't have that.
30:47
I didn't have, I was in studios and I couldn't say well, No,
30:50
no.
30:52
Um, this person called me into the office and she looked me
30:58
right in the eye and right in, right, right in the eyes and,
31:03
and her compassion.
31:08
I had only seen it once before with Soledad Canales.
31:11
This was the second time in my life when somebody looks me right
31:14
in the eyes and tells me, don't worry about it.
31:20
I know what you're going to.
31:22
I will do what I can't, to steer it elsewhere.
31:29
I won't let it get to you as my, I'll do whatever I can to prolong
31:38
the reality of it.
31:41
And I always couldn't believe it.
31:45
That person also doesn't know the impact that, that had in
31:50
me because two days later I was gonna pack and go to Tijuana
31:55
where, I don't know.
31:57
I don't know.
32:00
But that person telling me that I could come back the next day
32:03
and work.
32:06
It's, I, it's what the immigrant, it's a green light.
32:11
You know, it doesn't take that much to give somebody a green
32:16
light.
32:17
Yeah.
32:18
Just give them a green light.
32:19
You know, I know, I know there's the legalities of it and the
32:23
politics of it and the, let's just put that aside.
32:28
Just be a human being for once.
32:33
And, and so I'm, I'm big on green lights.
32:35
II, I see someone I give green lights because people gave me
32:39
the green light to be here and now I'm here, the profession
32:43
I have the opportunities I have I'm so grateful and I'm for
32:47
and fortunate, but it would have never happened if it wasn't
32:55
for those key people that had given me green lights for me to
32:59
cross the street.
33:01
You know, immigrants take a beating, they take a beating people
33:05
Look, look, look at them and, and, and there's a look of not
33:12
hate but not of love, not of compassion.
33:18
That's a human being right there.
33:21
That right, there was somebody's child at one point now, they're
33:25
an adult and look at them, they're just trying to make a living
33:29
That's all they're doing.
33:31
OK.
33:33
They have the same feelings you have, they love, they need
33:38
they laugh, maybe not as often as you, but they do laugh sometimes
33:47
And yeah, you know, one of the things that we, we, we struggle
33:59
with and this is just a part of the, the history of our country
34:04
You'll see one immigrant wave come in.
34:06
They inevitably are met with a lot of resistance.
34:09
But then as they begin to assimilate their Children or their
34:13
grandchildren disassociate from that experience and become
34:17
the oppressors of the next immigrant waiter, you know, so
34:22
part of what we're trying to do with this project is how do we
34:24
break that cycle?
34:25
How do we keep the Children and grandchildren of Latino immigrants
34:31
from being those people a generation or two from now?
34:37
It's a difficult difficult task.
34:39
But I think your project I think is the Immigrant Archive project
34:45
it's making steps towards that end result because a lot of
34:51
kids don't even speak the language.
34:55
They forget the language.
34:58
I don't blame them that much because they're, they're also
35:00
trying to defend themselves.
35:02
They're trying to be long, you know, they, they, they have
35:05
the name, you know, because, you know, they go to school and
35:08
there's a point, the finger pointing and they're ridiculing
35:10
and so you wanna, you know, speak English and, but the language
35:15
is important to, to, to, to stay connected to that compassion
35:20
It's so important, you know.
35:22
Uh because too often we lose sight of the fact that we're blessed
35:29
by so many breaks or we're cursed by so many breaks.
35:34
I, I sense that, that, that your Children and their Children
35:38
will have it far easier than you've had it.
35:42
I look at my own daughters, they've lived their life that doesn't
35:46
begin to look anything like the life I've led and is the equivalent
35:50
of living on another planet compared to their grandparents
35:53
you know.
35:54
Uh But it all has to go back to that.
35:57
They need to understand that they came from that, you know
36:01
and that they need to be thankful for the sacrifices of so
36:04
many other people.
36:06
And it's when we lose sight of it and we think that everybody
36:08
else, you know, lives in Beverly Hills or drive a fancy car
36:12
or take vacations whenever they want.
36:15
Uh, or, or because they do drive a fancy car or live in a fancy
36:19
home, the assumption that they always had or that they're
36:23
better than someone that doesn't drive a fancy car or, you
36:27
know, because everybody's entitled to those things.
36:30
If you work for them, if, if you work for them.
36:32
Yes.
36:33
Some people, they, they were born into it and that's ok.
36:37
But a lot of people have worked for it very hard and they deserve
36:41
those things too if they want them.
36:42
I mean, they're not important, you know, they're just, but
36:46
it's, but, but it's important that, that, that, that credit
36:49
and respect be given to the work that went into acquiring that
36:53
and not having the Children or grandchildren take it for granted
36:57
I understand that a lot of work and sacrifice wouldn't be getting
37:00
there.
37:01
That's, that's how I feel.
37:02
Yeah.
37:03
I, I guess that the responsibility of the parents, you know
37:06
I, I, it's a big responsibility because there will be resistance
37:10
from the kids normal.
37:12
They're growing up, they want their own sense of identity
37:14
Cool kids, blah, blah, blah.
37:16
It's tough.
37:17
It's, I mean, right now I speak to my little girl only in Spanish
37:21
because I tell her that I don't speak English.
37:24
That's my only way of doing it.
37:26
And when she wants something, she has to force herself to ask
37:30
me in Spanish because I go, uh, Papa don't, don't, don't speak
37:34
English.
37:34
I'm sorry, Mama, because she's already losing it.
37:40
But if she goes to school all English.
37:43
How old girl?
37:43
She's four.
37:45
So, yeah.
37:45
So, but then she hears me speak English and goes papa.
37:50
I heard you speak English.
37:52
Oh, no, I did.
37:54
Oh, my God, I'm learning.
37:55
You know.
37:55
So it's, it's, it's a big responsibility of us to, to let our
37:59
Children know that there was a struggle before them.
38:03
So they understand what immigrants go through.
38:09
You know, the, the sacrifices that they made so that they can
38:13
have a better life, which they will, you know, my Children
38:16
will have a better life.
38:18
But I hope they, they also retain a sense of compassion and
38:24
understanding for the new people who come the new immigrants
38:28
I don't want them standing on the other side of the street with
38:31
the banners saying, well, I'm an American citizen.
38:35
What are you doing here?
38:36
Get it like whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa daddy
38:40
wasn't an American citizen, you know, I was damned so be careful
38:46
So, so it's a tough job, you know, it's uh but this, this, these
38:50
stories that you capture with this wonderful project which
38:56
the feeling I got when I was first introduced to it at this dinner
39:01
I was in the back of the room and my mouth was open.
39:05
I was like, how cool is that?
39:11
Because we need role models.
39:13
We need people like ourselves up there so that we can in turn
39:19
feel like we can do that too, you know, and we also need that
39:25
not just for us as a community, but we also need that to show
39:29
those who aren't members of our community that we're just
39:31
like them, that we're no different.
39:33
We have the same dreams and aspirations.
39:36
We have the same love of family.
39:37
We have the same struggle.
39:39
We may look a little different.
39:40
We may sound a little different.
39:42
We may be a little louder.
39:43
Yeah, it's the same.
39:44
It's the same.
39:45
We want the same, we want to happiness, we want peace, we want
39:50
to, you know, give our Children a good life and we wanna enjoy
39:54
ourselves.
39:54
You know, life is short.
39:55
We'll be out of here soon.
39:56
All of us, you know, we just have to leave it.
40:00
Yeah, we need to be more compassionate to, to, to those who
40:04
are different, you know, those who are different than us.
40:06
You know, because sometimes even our own race will discriminate
40:10
against our own race because they're darker than us.
40:15
They're shorter than us.
40:16
They're not educated.
40:18
It's like, you know, we do the same.
40:20
It's just a, it's a cycle, you know, I mean, it's part of the
40:23
human condition that needs to be exercise, I think.
40:28
Yeah.
40:29
And I think uh art, it's a tool that can do that.
40:33
Art, art does that like music, music is universal.
40:37
Like music can open doors, art can open doors, the theater
40:42
and music and, and, and all those things.
40:45
Art has a way of bringing people's, of all backgrounds and
40:51
colors together.
40:54
Art is, I think it's a beautiful thing.
40:57
It, it, it's, it's been for me and, and my best friends are people
41:04
of the theater, not because I know them so long or because we
41:08
hang out all the time.
41:09
It's the compassion that they have for humanity.
41:15
People who are artistic or, or, or their eyes are open to art
41:20
and they, they have a sense of.
41:22
Yes.
41:24
Yeah.
41:25
Yeah.
41:26
No, no, no.
41:26
It's, it's a, it's a, it's a beautiful thing.
41:29
It's a, you know, but to be exposed to that because many people
41:31
are not.
41:32
So most people are not.
41:35
Yes.
41:35
So, for me, the key was that I was able to be exposed to them whether
41:42
by accident or however it happened, it happened because most
41:46
people are not, a lot of immigrants have no idea, no idea.
41:54
They don't know anything.
41:55
And there's no time for that.
41:57
There's no.
41:58
Yeah, exactly.
41:58
There, it's time people are working two full time jobs but
42:02
you can spend money to go to the theater as important as it is
42:05
But it's not, you know, you gotta feed, you gotta feed your
42:08
family first.
42:09
Yeah.
42:09
And, and you know.
42:11
Yeah.
42:12
Yeah.
42:12
But getting back to your point about, about, about art, um
42:16
it's what makes us human.
42:19
It's what separates us from the rest of the animals.
42:21
The other animals can't create art.
42:23
That's what makes us human.
42:24
You know, and sometimes it gets defunded and they don't take
42:27
it seriously.
42:27
And, you know, it's, it's, it's looked upon as something frivolous
42:31
Uh, and it's at the very core of our humanity.
42:33
Yes.
42:34
Yes.
42:34
I mean, art and even when it's bad it's good because not all
42:38
art is good.
42:39
I mean, it's so subjective but what it is is a form of expression
42:43
That person is learning to express themselves.
42:45
These are the beginning steps.
42:47
It's not very good.
42:48
It's like learning to speak.
42:49
So when you're hungry, you know, it's like it doesn't have
42:52
to be the best meal.
42:53
But if you're hungry it's still ok, it's good.
42:56
It feels good.
42:57
So, I mean, yeah.
42:58
Yeah.
42:58
I mean, it's, it's, you're right.
43:00
I mean, art is not available to everyone because people have
43:02
to work and feed their families.
43:04
Uh, but the more we can make it available to them, it enriches
43:09
your life so much.
43:10
Um, it helps you learn to express yourself in ways that you're
43:17
unable to do.
43:18
So because of your story because of the life you live.
43:24
You know, I mean, you know, I mean, I mean, those people have
43:28
tremendous stories.
43:30
I mean, just, just ask a couple questions if, if, if they're
43:33
willing to answer them.
43:35
Fascinating.
43:36
I mean, you just go, wait, you left your whole family to come
43:43
here and sell oranges.
43:47
Wow.
43:48
And how long did it take you?
43:49
02 weeks, two weeks, my God, I mean, and, and where did you sleep
43:59
And just, just, just, and, and, and, but they, but they still
44:03
get up and do it.
44:04
My God, the strength in these people to get up and do it.
44:10
And that's another reason why we started the project.
44:13
We also felt that mainstream America could really learn rather
44:20
than, rather than, rather than vilifying us.
44:24
If they could take a page from our playbook, you know, they
44:28
can see how in one generation a family comes over.
44:32
Father sells oranges on a street corner and his kid winds up
44:36
graduating from law school and wanders on every block.
44:40
You have to go very far.
44:41
I guarantee you, you can find some guys that are busy, you know
44:45
uh uh maintaining the grounds here whose kids are in a very
44:49
good college right now.
44:51
You know, and you don't see that too often in mainstream America
44:54
where family will make that exponentially jump in one generation
44:59
So they need to learn from us.
45:00
I think the country needs to learn from us.
45:01
That's a very good point.
45:03
You're right.
45:03
In one generation, the, the change that happens is huge.
45:08
This person is willing to take three jobs and, and walk and
45:12
and ride a bicycle to work and, and, and not have any leisure
45:17
activities for them so that their kids can have a better life
45:21
And then those kids graduate from some of the best schools
45:26
But if these kids were not given that opportunity.
45:29
That would have never happened.
45:31
You judge them as dumb kids.
45:34
All they need is the opportunity to read the books just like
45:37
you.
45:38
And there you will realize they're not dumb at all.
45:41
They're, I mean, yeah.
45:44
Yeah.
45:44
In one generation, the differences that can happen, which
45:47
which speaks volumes of the immigrant and speaks volumes
45:53
about the US.
45:54
This is one of the few countries where that can happen.
45:56
And that's the reason why we're such AAA magnet for so many
46:00
immigrants don't.
46:03
Oh, no, no, no, no.
46:04
I think it could only happen in this country.
46:05
I think I can, I mean, again, I'm no politician.
46:07
I don't have the data to say it, you know, factually, but I think
46:11
it can only happen here because it happens all the time.
46:15
You know, uh in other countries is not as easy, is not here.
46:22
Yes, you will struggle and you will work very hard and you will
46:25
endure very bad times.
46:30
But there is light at the end of the tunnel because there's
46:33
a lot of examples of many successful people who their parents
46:37
were immigrants and had nothing but they worked so hard so
46:42
that their Children would have an opportunity.
46:44
And now they're, these Children are pillars of society.
46:49
If they're not judges, they're great attorneys, they're
46:52
great professors, they're great artists.
46:55
They, they, they, they have a lot to offer to humanity, to society
47:01
and we would have never seen that if you don't give them that
47:03
opportunity.
47:04
So this country provides, you know, those channels, those
47:11
avenues, it will be hard, but you have to endure it and you will
47:16
succeed, you will succeed.
47:18
I mean, you know, I love the United States for allowing me to
47:22
stay even though they didn't want me at first.
47:26
You know.
47:26
But, uh, yeah.
47:28
Yeah.
47:28
You know, I had to do a lot of work and, you know, and eventually
47:31
like, just let him stay, he's not gonna go anywhere.
47:35
Yeah, exactly.
47:36
Just come on.
47:37
He said, look, he's not stealing, you know, he's, you know
47:40
he is fine, let him stay, you know, looking, looking back
47:44
uh what would you say you the proudest of uh Yeah, it is, it
47:57
is a tough question because I, I don't know, there's many sides
48:05
to that, but I will have to say that my proudest accomplishments
48:22
or feelings come from being a AAA father to my Children to give
48:34
them that love and compassion that I so wanted myself.
48:39
But I, it wasn't around.
48:41
I didn't and I could have just turned the other way and been
48:45
a bitter kid and, and because no one gave it to me, then I'm not
48:48
gonna give it to anyone and just be a dead be that and just, you
48:51
know, because it's an, it, it's what you expect.
48:54
It's what happens is it's that chain reaction and it continues
48:57
on and I I, and, and it takes awareness for you to be able to,
49:02
to change it and say, wait, I can do that.
49:06
I can do the opposite.
49:08
And, and so my Children to, to love my Children to, to just,
49:16
I mean, II, I think I get my wife makes fun of me because I, I just
49:22
I'm always hugging and kissing my little girl and I just go
49:26
II, I just, why not, why not?
49:29
You know, why, you know, I know one day she's gonna push me off
49:32
when she's 16.
49:33
Dad don't do that.
49:36
You know, because, you know, but being given the opportunity
49:40
to be a father to me is my biggest challenge and the biggest
49:46
struggle because I have struggle also.
49:47
I would, you know, my own little demons inside that I have to
49:52
like, quiet down and go.
49:56
Um, I'm overcompensating for what wasn't around because
50:03
I, I know what it was like to be a child and, and, and needing
50:08
some sort of sense of, uh, just compassion, love.
50:14
I mean, or someone patting you on the back and I think I would
50:18
have done really good in school if I had someone who would have
50:21
asked me for my grades.
50:22
Can I see your grades?
50:24
Mhm.
50:25
Or, or, you know, I play sports and, and no one ever came.
50:30
So I eventually quit because I was doing it because I wanted
50:33
someone to come and tell me you're good.
50:37
You know, so I know one's coming.
50:39
Let me just quit.
50:41
Uh So, you know, my proudest moment is, is being a dad and, and
50:49
loving my child and making sure that she grows, grows up to
50:53
be a AAA strong, smart, loving, fun, compassionate human
51:02
being that will help others when she's able to.
51:09
That's beautiful.
51:13
It make you wait for it, but they give it to you.
51:17
It doesn't always happen.
51:19
Yeah.
51:19
No, no, it doesn't happen.
51:20
It doesn't happen.
51:22
You know, they, they gave it to me.
51:24
I have to lie a lot of times but sometimes you have to lie.
51:29
I look, I don't want to but you're making me lie.
51:34
That's a good lie.
51:35
You know?
51:36
I mean, you know.
51:37
Um, no, I'm very fortunate.
51:39
I'm extremely, I mean, I was in an orphanage in te for 10 years
51:43
I didn't even think I'm, I, I, I'd be around after 18.
51:47
I mean, I didn't want to turn 18.
51:49
Everybody wants to turn 18.
51:50
I didn't want to because they're gonna give me $100 and tell
51:52
me to leave, leave where, you know, so I didn't wanna turn 18
51:59
But then, um, so no, I'm extremely fortunate grateful that
52:03
uh the universe God, life art has given me a green light to cross
52:09
the street and I done my work so that I can stick around and what's
52:15
next for you.
52:16
What's, what's, what's, and you've done film, you've done
52:19
television, you've done stage, seem like stage is a real thing
52:22
for you.
52:22
Oh, it's wonderful.
52:24
It's wonderful.
52:25
It's wonderful because the writing is so much better.
52:28
Uh One of my proudest moment was doing uh uh the Seagull uh checkout
52:32
playing Constantine, which is this kid who, who, who has this
52:37
grand idea, but he can't communicate it.
52:40
Nobody understands him.
52:42
So, you know, it was beautiful but a beautiful experience
52:45
Um But I, I enjoy my job, whether it's TV, film stage, you know
52:52
after all, it is a job.
52:54
You know, it's not always a wonderful day at the office.
52:59
Sometimes people think it is.
53:00
No, no, no, sometimes it isn't.
53:03
So it's my job.
53:04
It's my profession.
53:05
That's how I provide for my family.
53:07
So, you know, uh even jobs that, um, I'm not too crazy about
53:12
I will accept, uh what's next for me.
53:14
There's a couple of things up in the air, you know, a couple
53:16
of projects that they need to materialize.
53:19
They spend a lot of time in the air.
53:20
You know, it's like, uh, you know, things change so much in
53:23
this, in this profession that you don't know.
53:25
But I love that too.
53:26
I like, I like the uncertainty.
53:28
I lived in uncertainty all my childhood that I hated it, then
53:35
I hated it.
53:36
There was nothing I knew for sure whether I was gonna eat or
53:40
sleep or whatever and I hated it.
53:43
I just needed something certain and that, well, the music
53:46
was certain I could go home to my CD, my Javier Solis Jose Jose
53:51
for hours.
53:52
Oh Jose Jose, what I, oh am I am?
53:57
II, I love that man.
53:59
The, the pain in his voice and the way he, he sang those songs
54:04
I mean, my God, he is a beast.
54:10
It's unbelievable what he, what he went through.
54:12
You know, the people that took away from him and abused him
54:15
and used him.
54:17
He was living in the back of an abandoned car with and somebody
54:23
saved him and then he met the nurse and to be, but he's given
54:29
us so much joy, joy, so much joy and love and that man deserves
54:34
oh, he's oh my God, Jose.
54:39
Jose.
54:39
I mean to listen to him and I would listen to him for hours, I
54:44
mean hours, the same song.
54:52
No, no, no, no, no.
54:55
Everything I, his music used to give me even though I could
55:00
sense a pain in his voice.
55:02
And then it would give me some sort of comfort because I, my
55:09
I have my C DS, my, my and I have every single one of them.
55:14
So, so, you know, back to my point that the uncertainty I didn't
55:18
have then I now relish it as an adult because it means so much
55:25
in my work.
55:27
You know, every time you step into a role, it's supposed to
55:31
be the, the feeling is supposed to be for the first time.
55:34
So the uncertainty has to exist, you know, if it feels like
55:38
you know, some mechanical thing that's like, no, no, no.
55:40
This person is going through this the first time.
55:44
You know, even though you do it for many takes don't lose the
55:46
first time feeling because that's what people are gonna identify
55:49
with.
55:50
That uncertainty of what will happen.
55:52
Mm.
55:53
Or what will you say next?
55:55
Even though, you know, but you don't know that it's, it's,
55:59
uh now that uncertainty, I, I, I, I hold it dearly.
56:05
I cherish it.
56:06
Yeah.
56:07
Yeah.
56:07
Wait in closing.
56:09
If you could give a piece of advice, if you could speak directly
56:14
to a 10 year old boy just arriving in the US for the first time
56:21
knowing what, you know.
56:22
Now, what would you say to that boy?
56:30
The first thing I would do is whatever it would take to make
56:34
him smile.
56:35
Even if I have to get on my head or whatever, I have to act like
56:41
a clown or whatever.
56:42
I wanna see that child smile, a genuine smile.
56:46
So that's the first thing I wanna do once he smiles.
56:53
II, I don't know if his parents would let me, I would hug him
56:57
if not just high five.
57:01
I want to feel that connection with him and I want him to feel
57:05
it with me as a human being.
57:07
Even though we don't know each other right now, we're sharing
57:10
each other's lives even though it might be 20 seconds.
57:13
This moment might mean a lot to you or may not.
57:16
I don't know, but I'll do what I can so that it has an impact in
57:20
your life.
57:24
II, I don't, um, consider myself, uh, an expert on anything
57:32
even life itself.
57:38
So I, I'm not sure what I would say to him because my life is not
57:43
over yet.
57:44
I haven't won yet.
57:47
I'm still in the ring and I'm, I'm taking some punches and I'm
57:51
giving some too.
57:52
But the bell, nobody's rang the bell yet.
57:55
So I don't know what I could say to him.
57:59
What do you wish they would have said to you upon arrival?
58:01
What do you wish you would have known?
58:03
What do you wish you would have known then that perhaps, you
58:06
know, now an older smarter version of you more seasoned version
58:10
of you or like that little boy to know, I wish somebody would
58:16
have told me we like you, we like we like it when you're around
58:27
So come around more often, just feeling welcomed, just, just
58:33
the green light, just, just opening the door so that you feel
58:38
like you belong, you know, so I guess I would tell that child
58:43
you know, you are someone you may not know who you are now.
58:50
But I hope that one day you do know that you are someone what
58:55
I don't know but you are someone that has to count for something
59:01
The rest is up to you whatever your aspirations become as an
59:06
adult sports, um school, uh art.
59:11
I don't know, but never forget that you are someone and you
59:17
can make an impact on the life of others.